Guardians of the Galaxy #2 Ends with a Controversial Decision

Al Ewing’s Guardians of the Galaxy 2020 continues with our heroes putting a stop to the war-hungry Olympian God’s plans. With a unique take on the series with the original Guardians being retired similar to Old Man Logan style of comics, the series was bound to go in an interesting direction. The only issue though, it decided to take that drastic leap too early into the new series.

It is no secret that comics are retconned fairly frequently when fans aren’t happy with directions the comics take or the choices that the writers make. Guardians of the Galaxy may be one of those by killing off the most beloved and main character of the series, Peter Quill. Star Lord always finds himself in a tight spot and puts his life on the line but it is always his cunning that gets him out of these close calls. It’s these life and death moments that he puts himself in that create the most entertaining moments in the comics and the same even applies to Ewing’s rendition. Quill is by far the best character in the series so far because unlike Nova who gets taken out by Zeus in the first issue and Marvel Boy who seems to avoid all of the fighting, Quill is in the spotlight kicking ass and ensuring that the operation is a success.

In the first issue their plans end up being ruined and the mission a bust so the team must work together to escape the Olympian God’s base alive. The God’s have taken Rocket’s black hole bomb and seek to unravel its secrets for their own use and strengthen their military might. Rocket is mostly staying aboard the ship to fly everyone out once they fight their way through the enemies to escape. Quill on the other hand goes to retrieve the bomb so the Olympian’s cannot use it. We see Marvel Boy and the rest of the cast meet up with Hercules who then joins their side and this entire segment is absent from all the fighting.

This current issue continues that entire dialogue with Hercules as Marvel Boy and the others avoid fighting and providing any entertainment to the story as a whole while Ewing triggers the red flags of doom for Quill with how the scenes are constructed and the dialogue used. It definitely makes for great entertainment and part of me was hoping that Ewing was just triggering the flags to make good use of tropes and edge-of-your-seat action since Quill is an old man now who is past his prime and as such, he is undergoing the Old Man Logan character development cycle.

In short, the entire cast doing absolutely nothing to contribute to the story and then there is Quill who is doing everything to move the story forward. He see him using his cunning tactics to defeat not one but two of the Olympian Gods by himself. Quill is absolutely bad ass and does pretty much everything in the first two issues with defeating the enemy and completing his mission that when the end of the issue comes and he makes the ultimate decision to detonate the bomb manually and thus perish with everything else as the others escape, it feels like it cheats the reader out of a good story.

Sure, those moments were great and having those cliche moments of self-sacrifice are very enjoyable but from just a writing standpoint, it’s a big mistake to kill off the one character who is actually doing something while the rest of the cast does nothing. When you have a cast of characters that do very little no one is going to be invested in them like they would with Star Lord.

While the story was very enjoyable I do believe Ewing made a controversial choice, one I believe was a mistake, to kill off such a main and pivotal character like Star Lord. You may have your series like Old Man Logan where Logan dies but that doesn’t happen until the very end of his story. Quill is basically that main character so think of it was killing off your main character only in the second chapter. I am unsure what will happen from here but I definitely won’t be surprised if this isn’t very well received and the series gets scrapped before it can even begin.

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